James Nagurney - National Business Development Manager
James Nagurney
National Business Development Manager
Kurt Hildebrand
Director of Practices and Initiatives for Enterprise Storage
Lane Shelton - Vice President of Software Business Development
Lane Shelton
Vice President of Software Business Development
Rich Faille - Director of Mobility Practice
Rich Faille
Director of the Mobility Practice
Tony D'Ancona - Vice President of Professional Services
Tony D'Ancona
Vice President of Professional Services
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Stephen Nardone - Director of Security Solutions and Services
Featured Story

Top Four Essentials for Your Security Policy

Don’t Get Caught without These

by Stephen Nardone | Thursday, October 30, 2014

In an era when security threats morph daily and compliance regulations get more complex every year, creating a solid and up-to-date security program is crucial. Here’s how to do it.

To be worth its salt, a good security program must cover your organization end-to-end and line up with your company’s risk management strategy, and provide all the necessary standards, guidelines, and policies to enforce the program. It must also be flexible enough to incorporate ongoing revisions and updates. And it must be enforceable—otherwise, it’s just an object of employee derision and a waste of time.

Create an end-to-end policy (don’t just talk about it)

A 2013 study showed that business executives and IT managers believed coordination of a security program across the company’s entire data network was “essential.” Nevertheless, many organizations neglect to include their whole range of data assets when setting a program and developing policies. End-to-end security means protecting data from its point of origin, through all points of transit, to its resting point in storage. You need to examine these points for all of your company’s data, whether they lie on your own servers or in a cloud, and set up measures to address any potential security gaps. Encryption, authentication, authorization, and other means of access control should all be included in the policies and spelled out for every type of data. Include information about penalties for violations, such as revocation of credentials and denial of access, so users can see that the program has teeth.

Few things are more important to your company than the protection and proper management of data. Just as you wouldn’t hand over the keys to your home to a total stranger, you shouldn’t entrust your company’s information systems to a third party without thoroughly vetting them. Here are some of the important qualities to look for.

What's New in the World of Microsoft?

Get Your Updates Now

by James Nagurney | 09.02.14

Can you believe some businesses are still running Windows XP? Check out the story below, as well as the rest of your Microsoft headlines, for the latest and greatest on the software giant.

Technology Blog

Our technology blog, Connected, serves as your one-stop resource for valuable insights from our on-staff technology experts and featured industry leaders regarding the latest news and information on business IT solutions and technology trends.