James Nagurney - National Business Development Manager
James Nagurney
National Business Development Manager
Kurt Hildebrand
Director of Practices and Initiatives for Enterprise Storage
Lane Shelton - Vice President of Software Business Development
Lane Shelton
Vice President of Software Business Development
Rich Faille - Director of Mobility Practice
Rich Faille
Director of the Mobility Practice
Tony D'Ancona - Vice President of Professional Services
Tony D'Ancona
Vice President of Professional Services
»See All Authors
  • AwardsIndustry Recognition and More
  • EventsExpos, Conferences, and More
Bill Virtue - Senior Partner Development Specialist
Featured Story

Microsoft Server 2003 Only Has a Year Left

Is Your Organization Ready for a Data Migration?

by Bill Virtue | Tuesday, August 19, 2014

I recently delivered training on Dell’s Migration Manager, specifically targeting Microsoft Exchange and Active Directory, and I’d like to share some tips for a smooth migration. Any migration is no small task for IT, and those who have conducted a migration in the past often shy away from doing it again. That said, Microsoft Server 2003 Datacenter, Enterprise, and Standard Editions will go End of Support (EOS) in July 2015, and many enterprises are still running Microsoft Server 2003. Many of those servers house Active Directory, Domain Controllers, Exchange 2003 Servers, SQL Servers, and more. Those Exchange environments will need to move to a newer platform such as Microsoft Exchange Server 2013. As you know, Exchange and Active Directory are tightly integrated, and migrating both Exchange and Active Directory will be a big challenge for many in the coming months. Read on to find out what you can do to ease the transition. [read more]

Be Prepared

The first step in any major project is preparation. Data migration is a very strategic project, and budgeting should be part of the initial planning which may include new hardware given that many Microsoft 2003 Servers are likely running on older hardware, and the importance of end of support cannot be ignored. Data center migrations are a complex and time consuming activity that must be executed without affecting business operations. A hardware refresh, software upgrade, or both, mean that SLAs including performance, availability, and data protection must be maintained.

A question I often hear is “How long does a migration take?” In smaller organizations, an offline migration may be accomplished over the weekend, but in many SMB and larger enterprises these projects will occur in phases over several months.

In a world of big data, having a disaster recovery and business continuity strategy in place is essential. A Ponemon Institute study showed that a single minute of downtime costs the average business $5,600. As companies continue to increase automation, that number will only rise. An Aberdeen report found that hourly downtime costs increased by 38% from 2010 to 2012 to an industry average of over $400,000 a year.

Software Defined Networking

The Path to a More Cost-effective Infrastructure

by Tim Allen | 08.14.14

As cloud, mobility, and other trends create more complex architectures, networks must be able to adapt in terms of security, scalability, and manageability. Software-defined networking (SDN) is an ideal technology to simplify your infrastructure.

Technology Blog

Our technology blog, Connected, serves as your one-stop resource for valuable insights from our on-staff technology experts and featured industry leaders regarding the latest news and information on business IT solutions and technology trends.

Follow Us
RSS Feed
Featured Bloggers
Bill Virtue - Senior Partner Development Specialist
Senior Partner Development Specialist - Dell
Director of Practices and Initiatives for Enterprise Storage
Stephen Nardone - Director of Security Solutions and Services
Director, Security Solutions and Services